G-AHS marching band wakes up with 'Dreamzzz' after chaotic COVID year

Shawn Hardy
Echo Pilot

Jasmine Bailey and Dorian Pryke are ready for some sweet "Dreamzzz" this year as the drum majors for the Greencastle-Antrim High School marching band.

The 49 musicians and color guard members who make up the 2021 Blue Devil marching band have been rehearsing their show at band camp, which got underway last week and continues this week.

Jasmine Bailey and Dorian Pryke are the 2021 Greencastle-Antrim High School marching band drum majors.

This year's show is titled "Dreamzzz" and depicts a dream sequence — the fall from consciousness, restful sleep and the nightmare you wake up from, said Peter Vincenti, band director.

"The music reflects the state of mind," he explained.

Vincenti compared the show to a book in which the musicians write the words and the color guard gives the pictures.

"It's gonna be a good show," said Jasmine, who is a senior.

Members of the Greencastle-Antrim High School marching band practice their 2021 show 'Dreamzzz' during band camp on Aug. 3.

Photo gallery: Greencastle-Antrim High School marching band prepares for 2021 show 'Dreamzzz'

Playing during pandemic: Virtual winter concert orchestrated at Greencastle-Antrim High School

"My mantra to them is 'Be positive,'" said Vincenti.

That's working, according to Jasmine, who said everyone is incredibly positive and lifting up their leaders and each other.

"I'm really excited we have the band together," she said.

Drummers Marc Alexander, left, and Owen Monday practice the Greencastle-Antrim High School marching band's 2021 show 'Dreamzzz' during band camp on Aug. 3.

Dorian, a junior, also is happy "to be back as a band again" after last year's chaotic COVID-19 season.

Tuba players Colin Stike, left, and Larson Thomas practice the Greencastle-Antrim High School marching band's 2021 show 'Dreamzzz' during band camp on Aug. 3.

Because of the pandemic there was no band camp, an abbreviated season, no competitions, no away football games and a shorter show — just five minutes, compared to the usual seven and a half or eight, Vincenti said.

After a year of masks, Dorian said, "It's great to see people's faces, see people smile and make people smile."