Steel from Ground Zero on display at Allison-Antrim Museum

PAT FRIDGEN
Allison-Antrim Museum, Greencastle, has on display a replica of the Twin Towers, courtesy of a Waynesboro man who was part of cleanup efforts after the terrorist attacks. The piece is part of the 10th anniversary observance of 9/11.

As part of the 10th anniversary observance of 9/11, the Allison-Antrim Museum has on display a replica of the Twin Towers, courtesy of a Waynesboro man who was part of cleanup efforts after the terrorist attacks. The figure is made from steel used by construction crews when the buildings were erected. The pieces were recovered from the north tower at Ground Zero. Ken Grams, a civil engineer working for AMEC, received the sculpture from ironworkers as a gift of gratitude for his assistance during the difficult time. The steel is shaped like the two tallest towers of the World Trade Center, with a larger cross between them.

"It represents what we have there," said Grams. "It was a tragedy. God was still looking over us."

The memorial exhibit runs throughout September, and also features scrapbooks of newspaper articles, books, Greencastle-Antrim High School student art from that school year,  a New York Fire Department fireman's hat donated by former mayor Rudolph Giuliani, photographs, journals, a video of the first 24 hours and other items. It is set up in the barn, which is open Monday through Friday, noon to 4 p.m. A special open house is this Sunday, Sept. 11 from 1 to 4 p.m.

Grams brought in posters and brochures related to the pivotal day. A Port Authority Police plaquard contains personal messages from the people he worked with. He also loaned an aerial map of the Hudson River and the carnage, captured on film by the military.

"I was lucky enough to get a copy of it," he said.

He was also one of the recipients of a U.S. flag, handed out by the Navy during Fleet Week ceremonies honoring recovery personnel.

Grams was in New York from January to June of 2002, serving as superintendent of a night shift team. They installed tiebacks to hold up the walls keeping out the river. Because the supportive infrastructure of the north and south towers had fallen, there was a risk the walls would cave in. They had been showing movement.

He has come to a conclusion about the significance of one of the country's most defining moments.

"We should come to the point that instead of God Bless America, it should be America Bless God."

Allison-Antrim Museum, Greencastle, has on display a replica of the Twin Towers, courtesy of a Waynesboro man who was part of cleanup efforts after the terrorist attacks. The piece is part of the 10th anniversary observance of 9/11.