Yellow ware part of Allison-Antrim Museum exhibit in November

Staff Writer
Echo Pilot
Allison-Antrim Museum, 365 S. Ridge Ave., Greencastle, will host a Sunday open house from 1 to 4 p.m. Nov. 14. The museum is also open on Mondays from 1- 3 p.m. and Wednesdays from 1 – 3:30 p.m. The above yellow ware mold is part of the special exhibit which features yellow ware. During the early 1800s, England exported large quantities of yellow ware to the United States. Shortly after the introduction of yellow ware to the U.S., potteries in New Jersey, New York, Vermont, Pennsylvania and Ohio began producing yellow ware pieces to satisfy the wants and needs of American housewives. There is no entrance fee to the museum house and barn, but donations are accepted. For information, call 717-597-9010 or visit www.greencastlemuseum.org

Allison-Antrim Museum, 365 S. Ridge Ave.,  Greencastle, will host a Sunday open house Nov. 14 from 1 to 4 p.m. The museum is also open on Mondays from 1- 3 p.m. and Wednesdays from 1 – 3:30 p.m.  

The special exhibit features yellow ware. During the early 1800s, England exported large quantities of yellow ware to the United States. Shortly after the introduction of yellow ware to the U.S., potteries in New Jersey, New York, Vermont, Pennsylvania, and Ohio began producing yellow ware pieces to satisfy the wants and needs of American housewives.  

A finer clay was used to make yellow ware than the clay used for red ware, which was porous, fragile, and coated with lead-based glazes. The firing temperature for yellow ware was 2,200 degrees F, which produced a hardened but porous piece of pottery that was sturdier than red ware. A second, and sometimes third, firing was required to apply the glaze.  Yellow ware was the utilitarian workhorse in American kitchens through the 1800s and only began to lose favor near the end of the 19th century, when American housewives’ tastes began turning toward white wares. Although yellow ware became less desirable, potteries continued the production of yellow ware well into the 20th century.

There is no entrance fee to the museum house and barn, but donations are accepted.

For information, call 717-597-9010 or visit www.greencastlemuseum.org