ENTERTAINMENT

Young author puts passion into words

PAT FRIDGEN
Liz Staley is now promoting her book about life in the future. Outlawed martial artists try to regain control of a corrupt government. She started work on the manuscript while a teenager.

Ten years after she started, Liz Staley's science fiction novel is polished, published and available for readers. 'The Hinomoto Rebellion' was released in August and culminates her obsession with anime.

The book cover and interior artwork are styled in the Japanese technique of animation. Anime uses exaggerated physical features such as the eyes, hair and limbs, and puts dramatic panels behind the characters.

The storyline also incorporates the Far East. The setting is 500 years into the future in Hinomoto, once known as Japan. Rebel martial artists try to overthrow a corrupt government.

"I got into anime before it was popular," said Staley, 26. Such cartoons became notable in the United States in the 1970s and 80s, and really took off with Sailor Moon and Dragon Ball Z. As such, her target readership is her peers, late teens to mid-20s. However, middle-aged readers have enjoyed the book, too. "That's kind of shocking," she said from her Hykes Road home.

Formerly from Baltimore, Staley began writing the book in high school. The summer after her junior year she stayed up late, as teenagers are wont to do, and, "I had a flash of inspiration. The prologue came into my head. I've been writing ever since."

A friend, Devin Blake, created the cover and Staley did the inside illustrations.

'Rebellion' is 350 pages and the first in what she plans as a four-part series entitled "The Aka Ryuu Chronicles." Book number two is well underway.

Staley and her husband Byron moved to Greencastle to house-sit for a friend deployed in Iraq. She promotes the book on her website www.oap-studios.com and through Amazon. She is also setting up booksignings, including Atomic Comics in Hagerstown.

Staley is excited about her accomplishment. "When you're writing it, it's digital and it's intangible. Then you see the first copy and it's got a cover and everything. You realize it's real. You can touch it and it's not just in your head anymore."