Two businesses to open this spring downtown

PAT FRIDGEN
Kim Robinson will open Highline Coffeehouse and Cafe in April. She is remodeling a house that has stood through much of Greencastle's history into a downtown retreat for people to eat and relax. The new shop is adjacent to train tracks and a stone's throw from the old highline train station.

This spring people will have two more choices on where to go for a cup of coffee, a meal, a place to relax and visit with good friends or to celebrate a family event. Greencastle west of Center Square will soon be home to two eateries, both compliments of local residents who are anxious to bring quality establishments to the downtown area....Highling Coffeehouse and Cafe and Bentley’s Old Mill Bakery and BBQ.

The owners have been busy for months making improvements to old structures, adding modern amenities while retaining the charm of yesterday.

Highline Coffeehouse and Cafe

Kim Robinson, owner of a construction company, and a real estate agent, thought she purchased the house at 101 W. Baltimore St. so she could move her home office to another location. She planned to rent the extra space to other professionals in the industry.

Even when the exterior was painted in the fall, offices were on her mind.

Then the idea unfolded. She and her husband Jeff loved coffee shops, and weekly visited different ones in the area. They enjoyed the atmosphere of each unique place. It occurred to Robinson about two months ago that Greencastle was prime for another one.

"This is what our community needs," she said. "It will be a fun venture."

She has been hands on in renovating the building, guessing its age to be over 100 years old. The oldest part, the front rooms on Baltimore Street, is separated from the back portion by a brick wall, now covered with new plaster and paint. The summer kitchen is gone, redesigned into usable space. The main entrance to her Highline Coffeehouse and Cafe will be on North Jefferson Street.

Ideally, Robinson would like to open in April. She has installed new windows, which are level, though the frames may slant with the lay of the floor. She was able to save the wood flooring, buried under layers of linoleum and carpet. Seven layers of wallpaper were tediously removed. A couple original light fixtures were preserved.

She is preparing four rooms on the main level and two upstairs for people to eat and relax. A fireplace is the focal point of one room. Guests will be able to view the old train station across the street. A wooden deck on the side next to the Norfolk Southern rail line, and a covered patio to the north of the shop, will allow outdoor lounging in pleasant weather.

Robinson is converting the upstairs kitchen into a commercial kitchen, and a dumbwaiter will be used by the staff to send food orders to diners on the main level.

Highline fare

The cafe will serve breakfast and lunch, and pastries such as scones and biscotti to go along with the hot drinks. Robinson will offer specialty coffees including espresso, capuccino and lattes, tea and frozen smoothies. On the retail side, gourmet coffee beans, both regular and flavored, and loose tea, will be available in the countered lobby.

Robinson is maintaining the railroad theme particular to Greencastle's history and loves the trains rolling by on a regular basis. She is excited about her project and has received hearty support from residents as they learn of her plans. And she is willing to make a sacrifice, keeping her office in her home.

"I believe this is what we need," she said. "I'm doing my best to give the community something nice."

Kim Robinson will open Highline Coffeehouse and Cafe in April. She is remodeling a house that has stood through much of Greencastle's history into a downtown retreat for people to eat and relax. The new shop is adjacent to train tracks and a stone's throw from the old highline train station.