President Donald Trump's son-in-law, Jared Kushner, is willing to cooperate with federal investigators looking into ties between Russia and the Trump campaign, his attorney said Thursday.

FBI probes Kushner-Russia meetings; more documents sought

 

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump's son-in-law, Jared Kushner, is willing to cooperate with federal investigators looking into ties between Russia and the Trump campaign, his attorney said Thursday.

 

The statement from attorney Jamie Gorelick was issued amid reports that the FBI was investigating meetings Kushner had in December with Russian officials.

 

"Mr. Kushner previously volunteered to share with Congress what he knows about these meetings. He will do the same if he is contacted in connection with any other inquiry," the statement said.

 

NBC News and The Washington Post first reported that the FBI's ongoing investigation includes a look at Kushner, which would place the probe inside the White House.

 

Kushner, a key White House adviser, had meetings late last year with Russia's ambassador to the U.S., Sergey Kislyak, and Russian banker Sergey Gorkov.

 

 

 

Trump budget dismays families hit by opioid addiction crisis 

 

NEW YORK — He slept next to his son's ashes most nights back when Kraig Moss first met Donald Trump.

 

In a hall packed with Iowa voters, the presidential candidate looked the middle-aged truck driver in the eye and vowed to fight the opioid crisis that killed his only son two years earlier.

 

"He promised me, in honor of my son, that he was going to combat the ongoing heroin epidemic," Moss said of the January 2016 interaction. "He got me hook, line and sinker."

 

Moss, an amateur musician, quickly sold enough possessions to fund a months-long tour of more than 40 Trump rallies, where he serenaded voters with pro-Trump songs. His guitar, and the ashes of his late 24-year-old son, Rob, were always close by.

 

"I had everything riding on the fact that he was going to make things better," Moss said. "He lied to me."

 

Trump's budget released this week would reduce funding for addiction treatment, research and prevention. The most damaging proposed cut, critics say, is the president's 10-year plan to shrink spending for Medicaid, which provides coverage to an estimated three in 10 adults with opioid addiction. Members of Congress have said they are unlikely to approve the budget as written.

 

 

 

Democrat concedes to Gianforte in Montana race

 

BOZEMAN, Mont. — Democrat Rob Quist conceded the contest for Montana's lone seat in the U.S. House late Thursday to Republican Greg Gianforte.

 

The country singer and political newcomer told supporters he called Gianforte and stressed the need to listen to all Montanans.

 

Quist said he was "sure that Montanans will hold Mr. Gianforte accountable."

 

Gianforte was charged with assaulting a Guardian reporter the day before the election. He apologized during his victory speech.

 

 

 

Finals are set in NBA, NHL

 

The Cleveland Cavaliers and Pittsburgh Penguins, who won the NBA and NHL championships, respectively, during the 2015-16 season, each took home victories Thursday night to secure a place in the finals.

 

The Penguins needed a goal in double-overtime to edge the Ottawa Senators, 3-2, in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Finals. They now will face the Nashville Predators in the Stanley Cup Finals beginning Monday.

 

The Cavaliers faced much less drama, rolling past the Boston Celtics, 135-102, in Game 5 of the Eastern Conference Finals. They will face the Golden State Warriors for the third consecutive season in the NBA Finals. That series begins Thursday.