CLEVELAND — The Chicago Cubs will have to deal with Corey Kluber again sooner rather than later.

Indians manager Terry Francona indicated Wednesday that the Cleveland ace will start Saturday’s Game 4 of the World Series in Chicago on short rest.

Kluber will work on three-days rest after he dazzled in pitching the Indians to a Game 1 win Tuesday. The 30-year-old right-hander worked six shutout innings and set an Indians’ World Series record with nine strikeouts.

Kluber was removed after Ben Zobrist’s lead-off single in the seventh inning. He threw 88 pitches.

“Part of taking him out then was with that in mind, that you start getting deeper into the game, and if they mount a rally, getting out of that, you’re really exerting,” Francona said. “You’re up around 100 or so, I think that’s unfair to ask him to come back after doing that.

“So we got him out of there. … He knew why, and he’s ready to go.”

Kluber has been fabulous in four postseason starts. He is 3-1 with a 0.74 ERA. That includes 29 strikeouts in 24.1 innings.

His one loss came on short rest. He was good, not great, as he allowed two runs on four hits in five innings at Toronto in Game 4 of the American League Championship Series.

Moving Kluber up means the rest of the rotation will move up and pitch on short rest, too. Game 2 starter Trevor Bauer would pitch Game 5, Game 3 starter Josh Tomlin would go in Game 6 and Kluber would come back for Game 7 if necessary. Of course, with how the Indians season has gone, that could change.

The Cubs hope that seeing Kluber again will lead to more success than the four hits they got off him Tuesday.

“I think it’s huge rhythm-wise, you start getting the feel for their rhythm a little bit better and the way their pitches move,” Zobrist said. “When you haven’t seen a guy for a long time, sometimes it can be tough.”

Mother Nature’s wrath
Game 2’s start time was moved up an hour to 7:08 p.m. because of the threat of bad weather.
Cubs manager Joe Maddon knows all about the impact the elements can have on World Series games.

He was managing the Rays in 2008 when they faced the Phillies in the Fall Classic. Game 5 was suspended in the sixth inning and not completed until two days later because of horrible conditions in the Philadelphia area.

“The game in Philadelphia was pretty severe,” Maddon said. “I don’t think it’s going to be Philadelphia-like weather conditions tonight. That game was very awkward to play. The rain was horizontal. It was freezing. There was actually standing water on the field. They wouldn’t even call an infield fly rule because the win was blowing so much. It was really an abnormally difficult night to play baseball.”

Said Zobrist, who played for the Rays then, “I remember watching B.J. Upton run around the bases and splashes of water coming up next to his feet. … It was one of the worst conditions I’ve ever seen a baseball game played in at the time.”

The Rays, who already were checked out of their hotel with the intention of flying back to Tampa Bay, had to scramble for somewhere to stay when Game 5 was suspended. They found a place in Wilmington, Del.

“I remember at 1 in the morning, the entire organization is standing in this magnificent lobby there,” Maddon said, “and I thought that was a pretty cool moment having us all there at the same time under some really difficult circumstances.”